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Send in YOUR questions for Critter Lit

Authors + IllustratorsLindsay WardComment

Welcome to Critter Lit's Curated Content! Every Thursday, make sure to drop by for news and updates on all things kidlit! Here's what you can expect to come each month:

- book reviews of newly published books

- spotlight on debut authors/illustrators and up + coming authors/illustrators

- craft post: tips on the trade and creation of picture books in the kidlit publishing industry

- Q+A: I'll answer YOUR questions!

Interested in breaking into the world of children's publishing? Send your questions to lindsay@critterlit.com. Each month, I'll answer YOUR questions and feature them here on Critter Lit's Curated Content. 

 

Book Reviews | June 2018

Recommended Reading, Book ReviewsLindsay WardComment

Welcome to Critter Lit Book Reviews! The first Thursday of every month Critter Lit will review two newly released picture books, representing two categories: WORDS and PICTURES, that are especially worth while and must reads. So without further ado, Critter Lit's picks for June 2018:

Drum roll please....

W O R D S (or I suppose in this case, word)

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Dude! by Aaron Reynolds, Illustrated by Dan Santat

Published by Roaring Brook Press, April 2018

Dude, this book is awesome! Seriously. The entire story is told using just one word. Which is kinda crazy when you think about it, but totally works. For those of you obsessing over your picture book word count, pay attention! AARON REYNOLDS DID IT WITH ONE WORD!

Dude! is a wonderful read aloud because it relies on the inflection of the reader's voice and delivery. I found myself laughing out loud at each page turn, while reading with my two-year-old, curious as to where the story was headed. Oh, and did I mention it's illustrated by Dan Santat? No biggie. I've always loved Santat's animals, in this case a platypus, a beaver, and a shark. He does such a wonderful job bringing their personalities to life. The added element of surprise with the shark is also well done.

There have been a batch of new shark books that have recently come out, but this may be my favorite. Highly original and funny!

Click here for more information on Dude!

P I C T U R E S

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The Digger and the Flower by Joseph Kuefler

Published by Balzer + Bray, January 2018

I absolutely LOVE the art in this book. It's stunning. I poured over each page, soaking up every detail Joseph Kuefler had to offer in his illustrations. The story is simple and lovely, with a touch of Ferdinand. Kuefler juxtaposes hard, cold, modern machinery with nature, specifically a delicate flower, all the while creating a character as warm and friendly as the digger in his story. Although the art is graphic in nature, Kuefler provides rich textures, shapes, and a sound palette, adding tremendous depth to the art. Bonus: it has a digger in it, so it will go over well with the kiddos.

Click here for more information on The Digger and the Flower

Getting Started

Lindsay Ward

Last night I did an author event at the New Philadelphia Library in New Philadelphia, Ohio. Shout out to them for a wonderful event! I had the pleasure of meeting a couple of aspiring writers and illustrators who wanted more information about publishing children's books. I'm always happy to offer information about this crazy world of publishing because that's what others did for me when I was just starting out. In fact, that is the whole point of Critter Lit! I love that our community of writers and illustrators is supportive of one another. We cheer when someone succeeds and commiserate when someone fails. It's something that I've always loved about my community.

So that got me thinking about what I did to get started. Of course each author or illustrator's journey into this business is unique, but these are some of the things that helped me.

So you want to be a children's book author or illustrator or both! Where to begin? The publishing world is intimidating and overwhelming. Most days it feels remote and untouchable. It's not. You just have to be willing to work incredibly hard and never ever give up. Which is a lot easier said than done. I know. So how do you make something seem possible? Immerse yourself in it. Then it doesn't feel quite so scary.

Tip No. 1 - READ A TON OF BOOKS

First and foremost, you need to educate yourself. Make friends with your local bookseller or children's librarian. Find out which books are being talked about. Which books they love. Which books they see people responding to. The more you read the better you will understand what the market is and what other authors and illustrators are doing. This will also help you understand how your ideas will fit into the market. Who will buy your book? Is it marketable? My first job was in a children's book shop. This is where my education began. That coupled with a voracious reading habit helped me understand the children's book market.

Tip No. 2 - JOIN A WRITING GROUP/CRITIQUE GROUP

You have to get out of your own head and share your work. Finding a group of people who you can share your writing or illustrations with is tremendously helpful. You can give and receive feedback that can make all the difference for your project. I've been apart of the same critique group for a couple years now. We try to meet once a month and share new stuff that each of us is working on. Some of us are author/illustrators and some are authors only. This dynamic has been great for us to get well-rounded responses to our work. I tend to share my ideas with my critique group first before diving in and writing. They have been my barometer for whether or not I have a good idea bouncing around and if I should develop it further.

Tip No. 3 - JOIN SCBWI

SCBWI - The Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators. This is one of the best resources for authors and illustrators, especially if you are just starting out. SCBWI is a national organization with chapters all over the country. Each chapter has their own events (critique groups, meetings, conferences, etc.). There is also a huge Summer and Winter conference in New York and Los Angeles every year. The great thing about SCBWI is that it provides a support group of like-minded individuals. Everyone loves children's books. You can meet editors, art directors, authors, illustrators, book designers, agents, and more through this organization. It's also a place where you can ask lots and lots of questions about the industry and receive answers from professionals currently making books for kids. For more information about SCBWI, click here.

Tip No. 4 - COMMIT

No one is going to write your book for you. If you want to break into publishing you have to be willing to work your butt off. Seriously. This is a tough business. You are your biggest advocate. So stop putting off your writing and just do it. Make a commitment to write every day. Finish your book. Be brave and keep creating what you love.

Tip No. 5 - BE SOCIAL

Make friends. Be supportive. Find out what authors and illustrators are doing. Twitter and Facebook are great resources for this. You never know who you might connect with and where that could lead.

Until next time...

Happy Writing!

Lindsay

Making Brobarians - A Look Back At Last Summer

book release, Authors + Illustrators, Authors, IllustratorsLindsay WardComment

To say that last summer was crazy would be an understatement. Within a matter of three months I finished Brobarians and we sold our house. By the end of the summer, we were in tow with a baby and dog and no place to live (our house sold much faster than we anticipated). Thankfully our parents were willing to take us in until we could close on a new house (we bid and lost out on FOUR houses until we found our current house, which was totally worth the wait, but still it was crazy!) Here’s a look at some of the photos I took while making Brobarians last summer:

 The beginning of making a picture book. Lots of staring at a wall filled with drawings.

The beginning of making a picture book. Lots of staring at a wall filled with drawings.

 This was the first color sample I did for  Brobarians .

This was the first color sample I did for Brobarians.

 The tiniest Brobarian you've ever seen!

The tiniest Brobarian you've ever seen!

 Making a Brobarian in cut paper (back + front!)

Making a Brobarian in cut paper (back + front!)

 Illustrating my own dog Sally into the book.

Illustrating my own dog Sally into the book.

 Seen here with her own Brobarian.

Seen here with her own Brobarian.

 Adding in the rain.

Adding in the rain.

 In order to make the Map of Brobaria endpapers look like it was actually drawn by a kid, I drew it left-handed. It was much harder than I thought it would be.

In order to make the Map of Brobaria endpapers look like it was actually drawn by a kid, I drew it left-handed. It was much harder than I thought it would be.

 The red squares = complete. This is how I kept track of which spreads I had finished as I typically don’t work chronologically.

The red squares = complete. This is how I kept track of which spreads I had finished as I typically don’t work chronologically.

 The aftermath of a picture book. I’m usually finding bits of paper from a book months after I’ve finished it. The paper gets EVERYWHERE!

The aftermath of a picture book. I’m usually finding bits of paper from a book months after I’ve finished it. The paper gets EVERYWHERE!

 Not to worry, even thought I finished the book, I still have my own little Brobarian who keeps me on my toes.

Not to worry, even thought I finished the book, I still have my own little Brobarian who keeps me on my toes.

Until next time,

Happy Reading!

Lindsay

Making BROBARIANS - The Cover

publishing, Illustrators, book release, Authors + Illustrators, AuthorsLindsay WardComment

Making the cover for any book is stressful. So many things factor into the design and overall look. And of course there is the ultimate question bouncing around in the back of your mind...Will this cover sell this book? For most books I work on, I go through many revisions before I settle on the right look for the cover. So far my record is 40 cover sketches (When Blue Met Egg). Thankfully Brobarians didn't require quite that many. Here's a look at the sketches that lead up to the final cover I chose for Brobarians with the wonderful team I worked with at Two Lions:

  Brobarians  Cover Sketch 1

Brobarians Cover Sketch 1

I think I was a little gung-ho on this one. We ultimately didn't go with this option because we didn't want to give away the fantasy scenes included in the interior of the book. This is where the reader sees how the brothers actually see themselves in their imagination.

  Brobarians  Cover Sketch 2

Brobarians Cover Sketch 2

Although this really conveyed the action and energy of the story through the movement of the brothers running, we wanted readers to connect with the characters, which is tough through a profile image.

  Brobarians  Cover Sketch 3

Brobarians Cover Sketch 3

Now we were getting somewhere. We could see the brother's environment, we had a head on perspective to connect with them. But, by closing Iggy's eyes, the reader loses the connection with him. So this cover option didn't make it either.

  Brobarians  Cover Sketch 4

Brobarians Cover Sketch 4

I tried a variation on Cover Sketch 3 by doing more of a close-up on the brothers. Obviously Iggy's eyes closed was still an issue, but I wanted to see if a close-up would make a difference. Ultimately, we felt that we understood the context better if we could see more of the background and the objects they were holding on to.

  Brobarians  Cover Sketch 5

Brobarians Cover Sketch 5

Again, super gung-ho. I loved the idea of this cover, but it would have given away too much. And this spread in the book is one of my favorites. Having gone this way for the cover would have taken away from the climax of their battle scene.

  Brobarians  Cover Sketch 6

Brobarians Cover Sketch 6

While I was sketching all of the cover options, this was one of my favorites. But after some back and forth over it with the team at Two Lions, we decided the attitude the boys had was a little too much and didn't really reflect the feel of the book. 

  Brobarians  Cover Sketch 7

Brobarians Cover Sketch 7

Finally, we had a winner! I say finally like seven sketches is a lot, it's really not. But I was thrilled with this sketch and so happy that the team at Two Lions loved it too. It showed the environment, the brother's personalities, and the feeling of the book. It was the whole package! You'll also notice we dropped the hyphen in the title. We thought this would be much easier for readers when looking for the book in a search engine. Next, we had to make the jacket...

  Brobarians  Cover Sketch 7 - Final

Brobarians Cover Sketch 7 - Final

Here's the final sketch.

  Brobarians  Jacket Sketch

Brobarians Jacket Sketch

Then I created the rest of the art for the jacket. Now I needed to add color...

  Brobarians  Jacket - Color Finish

Brobarians Jacket - Color Finish

This is how the art looks when I send it to my editor and art director for approval. Everything is taped down so that I can still make changes. I had run out of drafting tape at this point and all I had left was floral wasabi tape, thus the patterned tape everywhere. I don't glue anything down until the very end.

  Brobarians  Jacket

Brobarians Jacket

Then the book designer goes in and lays out all the copy on the flaps and spine of the book. We went through a few changes with this until we settled on the perfect one. I'm thrilled with how it all came together. I worked with an amazing team of people at Two Lions.

  Brobarians  - Final Cover

Brobarians - Final Cover

Ta-da! Here's the final cover! I'd come along way since the cover I submitted with my book dummy during the submission process:

  Brobarians  - Original Book Dummy Cover

Brobarians - Original Book Dummy Cover

So all that for one cover - no big deal right? I hope you enjoy Brobarians as much as I do. For more information about the book or to pre-order Brobarians, click here.

Until next time, Happy Reading!

Lindsay

Making BROBARIANS, or How to Be Inspired to Write a Picture Book by Arnold Schwarzenegger

Illustrators, Authors + Illustrators, Authors, book releaseLindsay WardComment

At the end of this month, my newest picture book BROBARIANS with Two Lions, an imprint of Amazon Publishing, will pub on March 28th. I'm so excited to share this book with all of you for many reasons, but mostly because I never thought this book would be published. I honestly didn't think anyone would get it. It's weird and quirky and has nods to the writing of John Milius, who isn't exactly the poster boy for childhood. Yet here we are, a month out from publication thanks to all the fabulous people at Two Lions who believed in it too.

Let me start from the beginning. My husband has this list of must-see movies. He's very particular about them and feels that they are necessary to be a well-rounded viewer/human being. In other words, if you haven't seen them, he won't think much of your movie taste. What can I say, he's particular about his movies. One of the movies on his list is Conan the Barbarian, written and directed by John Milius, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger. I know what you're thinking. Really, that's on the list? Yes. And like all of you, I thought could this movie really be worth two hours of my life? But my husband insisted. Apparently my life would be stunted without it this viewing experience. So we watched it. And to be honest, I hated the first half hour of it. It was campy, cheesy, and completely ridiculous. But then something strange happened, I started to enjoy the campy, cheesy, and completely ridiculous dialogue. It was so over the top. This movie represented everything I would typically pass on, but for some reason it all worked. By the end of the two hours I loved it. And better yet...and book idea was forming.

I realized that the voice of Conan the Barbarian is what really sets it apart. I don't mean Arnold's voice, but rather the words of John Milius, the writer. This is the same guy who wrote Red Dawn, Apocalypse Now, Dirty Harry, etc. An over the top, larger than life writer and director in the movie business. In fact, if any of you have seen The Big Lebowski (another movie on my husband's list) the character played by John Goodman is based on Milius. I imagine you have to be pretty bold to create his resume. Days after watching Conan, the voice stayed with me.

And then I remembered a story my husband told me about he and his brother when they were little. My husband is two years older than his younger brother. By the time his younger brother was walking around with a bottle, my husband had already been weened off of them. But that didn't change the fact that he still wanted one all the time. So on occasion my husband was known to steal his younger brother's bottle and go hide behind a chair while he gulped it down. This lasted a whole of five minutes before their mom would figure out what had happened and take the bottle away. Apparently this became a household routine.

So between the Conan voice bouncing around in my head and the story my husband told me...BROBARIANS was created. As soon as the idea popped into my head, I wrote the first draft in one go. The story went through many, many, many drafts and revisions. But finally I was ready to create a dummy and send it to my agent. She must have thought I was crazy the first time she read BROBARIANS. I knew it was going to be a tough sell because the voice was so adult. But I also knew that's where the humor was. This idea of babies juxtaposed with this over-the-top narration was too funny not to try.

We went out on two rounds of general submission and magically two houses were interested! I couldn't believe someone was going to let me publish this book. Even now I still feel that way. Ultimately we felt that Two Lions and Amazon were a great fit for BROBARIANS.

After finishing the book, I received the best editorial letter yet, to which my editor said:

"I can say with certainty that this is the only time I have ever said this to anyone: thanks for watching Conan the Barbarian."

So...here's the point of this post: you never know where your ideas will come from, least of all a movie night with your husband starring Arnold Schwarzenegger. Who'd of thought?

I'm thrilled to share BROBARIANS on March 28th! I hope you all find it as funny as I do!

Lindsay

To pre-order BROBARIANS, please click here.

Make sure to check back during the month of March for more posts about the making of BROBARIANS!

Create What You Love. And Do It Everyday.

publishing, Illustrators, Authors + Illustrators, AuthorsLindsay WardComment

Create what you love. And do it every day.

At 31 this is what I would have told my 24-year-old self when I started in publishing.

It sounds relatively simple right? Wrong. Or at least, that’s how it was for me. Specifically the do it everyday part. I didn’t keep a sketch book. I didn’t write everyday. I didn’t think about new ideas all the time. I’d come up with a book idea. Write it. Make a dummy. And pitch it. If it sold, I’d make said book. Exert a serious amount of energy and then feel like I needed a three month vacation. And then repeat the whole thing all over again for the next book. Which isn’t exactly wrong. The problem was that I was treating my book career like a hobby. A career is not something you do occasionally. It’s something you invest your time in everyday. And I love my job. So why wasn’t I investing my time?

For me it was easy to step back and say I deserved a break after completing a book. It takes a lot of work! But I found when I looked at it like this, it started to feel like a burden. And writing and illustrating is not a burden, it’s a privilege. Truly. So I realized it was time for a radical change. Which is funny because 2016 was insanely full of them for me and my family, so why not add one more?

This past August we sold our house, bought a new one (but not without being transient for three months at my parents and in-laws with a baby and dog in tow). Renovated the new house because it was a total disaster. Moved in two days before Christmas and basically reinvented our whole work schedule. It was a massive overhaul. And it changed everything in the most difficult and best way possible.

So…

It’s 6:19am right now and I’ve already been up for an hour and half. 

This is what I do everyday now. Including Saturdays and Sundays. Which today is Saturday. I wake up at 5am and work for a solid four hours before most people start their work day. And I do it seven days a week. I know what you’re thinking…I can’t do that. I can’t wake up that early. I’m too busy. (I know this because those are all the things I said when my brilliant husband suggested this to me.) He told me that in an average work day, people are only truly productive for four hours, which is crazy considering most people work a job from 9-5 everyday. So why couldn’t that work for me? It would certainly allow me to be a mom and take care of my home and family in a much more efficient way than I was already, let’s be honest, struggling to do.

It’s all about commitment to craft. Do you love to create? Great. Do you love creating so much that you would get up and do it at 5am? Because that’s what it takes. Everyday. Even if you have another job. I’m not saying you have wake up at 5am like I do, but you do have to be committed to making time for your craft each and everyday. I picked 5am because I like feeling like I’ve already worked a solid block of time before the day has really started, that and I have a 18-month-old son. This is the schedule that works for me and my family. You have to find what works for you.

Because here’s the thing - if you keep waiting for extra time to come along for you to create your next idea, it won’t. Time doesn’t give a crap about you or the millions of things you have to get done everyday. Now, don’t get me wrong, there are plenty of mornings I get up and everything I write is terrible and my drawings are awful. But I still keep going. I push to get through those four hours even if it’s killing me.

Here’s what a typical morning looks like:

5am: Roll out of bed, which is difficult every morning. I don’t think that will ever change. Especially when my dog (a mid-sized portable heater) snuggles next to me. She is not supportive of my early morning drive.

5:05am: COFFEE.

5:10am: Some sort of stretch or repetition of ten to get blood flowing. My hands are stiff in the morning. And my brain is fuzzy. This helps. Seriously. I know it sounds silly, but it works.

5:10-6am: Draw. Anything. As much as I can. Whatever pops into my head. I use Japanese PiGMA pens and whiteout for corrections. I started using this method for a few reasons. I generally stay away from black ink in my work, it always feels too harsh or heavy. I tend to prefer grey or navy ink or a simple pencil line. But my goal is to make intentional lines, no second-guessing myself, and pencil encourages hesitation. The more I used the black ink, the more confident I became in the lines I was making. Going directly to ink, rather than creating a pencil sketch first, pushes me to be decisive with my line. Now, of course, I still make plenty of bad lines and change my mind about the drawing as it comes together - thus the whiteout. But I find that my morning sketches have a way of maintaining the integrity of the line I intended because I haven’t sketched, used a light table to transfer, and then created the finish. The first drawing is the finished drawing.

6am: Then I post one of my morning sketches. This is a relatively new thing. I’m horrible at social media. But I found that posting a drawing everyday makes me feel accountable to something. Like if I miss a day, everyone will know. Which isn’t really the point, the drawing is for me, but thinking this way is encouraging. Keep drawing. Keep creating.

6am-7am: Write. I allocate a solid hour to NEW creative writing every morning. Not editing. Not a book I’m currently under contract for. But new ideas. This part is really difficult for me. I tend to self edit a lot as I write. I work on just getting words on the page in this hour. The computer I write with doesn’t have access to internet intentionally. The internet is a time succubus that doesn’t care about the creative work you need to do, so ignore it.

7am-9am: This is when I do the work I’m contractually accountable for, like new books or illustration jobs. Currently, I’m working on finishes for my new book, DON'T FORGET DEXTER.

9am: I walk out of my bat cave and see my little man. This is my favorite part. Because this is the part where I actually feel like I’m devoting time to my craft and my family. I don’t feel torn between carving out time during the day to work or play with my son. This schedule allows me to do both and feel good about my use of time.

The rest of the day is spent working during the time my son is napping. Before I did the 5am wake-up, I’d get really stressed out because I could only work during his naps. Sometimes he would wake up early, sometimes he wouldn’t sleep at all. I couldn’t focus. And it felt like I wasn’t able to get anything done because of constant interruptions. But now, by the time he’s up, I’ve already worked four hours, so anything else I’m able to accomplish is a bonus.

Then at some point, I take a walk with my family, to reboot and think about new ideas.

Now obviously, everyone’s schedule is different. People have day jobs, kids, and a million other responsibilities. And I’m not suggesting to all of you that this is what you have to do to be successful with your craft. All I can tell you is that this is how I feel successful on my own terms, without external pressures telling me otherwise.

*Also, in case you’re wondering, my husband is self-employed and works from home too. Which means I have to make those four hours count. I have to hustle. We both do. There is no day job income to fall back on for us. This is the price we pay for the freedom to create and spend time with our son everyday.

If you get anything at all out of this post, I hope it’s this: don’t waste time waiting around for the perfect moment to create because it will never come.

You have to make time for what you love.

Happy writing!

Lindsay

Top Five Favorite Picture Books - Writing

publishing, Illustrators, Authors + Illustrators, AuthorsLindsay WardComment

My husband and I read to our son every night. And every night it's always so tough to pick what books to read. My husband just grabs books off the shelf at random, without even looking. I, on the other hand, sit there staring, as if its the most important decision I'll make all day. It's usually not, but that doesn't change the fact that I still do it every night.

Over the years, I've amassed quite the picture book collection, as I'm sure you can imagine. Some as a bookseller, some as an illustrator, some as an author/illustrator, and now, as a mom. It's funny how my tastes have changed since becoming a mom. Before I would buy books that had really amazing art, I didn't pay that much attention to the story. As someone who came to publishing as an illustrator first, the writing in any book always came second to me. If I didn't like the art, I wouldn't buy the book. Period. Even if it was an amazing story. Now, I want the whole package. I expect amazing art and text. If I'm going to add it to our collection, it better be good. Like really good. It's the same attitude I have when I create my own books. I have to make a brilliant book so it can hold it's own against millions of other books. So that someone will want to add it to their collection and share with their family. The way I do. 

There are so many books to choose from, even among the collection we've already created based on our family's tastes. My son is still young enough that he isn't really picking books out himself just yet (unless is a very loved and chewed copy of Little Fur Family - what can I say he loves the "kerchoo" part, laughs every time).

So here's my list of five books that every time I read them I think "man, I hope I'm this good some day." They are the books that I never tire of reading. Some old, some new. The ones that are just so good, no holes, nothing I would change. Perfect in my opinion.

I've focused this list on storytelling, although every single one of them has amazing art that deserves it's own shout out. 

1. INTERRUPTING CHICKEN By David Ezra Stein

It’s time for the little red chicken’s bedtime story —and a reminder from Papa to try not to interrupt. But the chicken can’t help herself! Whether the tale is HANSEL AND GRETEL or LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD or even CHICKEN LITTLE, she jumps into the story to save its hapless characters from doing some dangerous or silly thing. Now it’s the little red chicken’s turn to tell a story, but will her yawning papa make it to the end without his own kind of interrupting?

This might be my favorite read-a-loud of all time. Seriously. It's that good. This one is on my list for a few reasons. One, I never get tired of reading it (which is always a good starting point). Two, at 1 1/2, Jack actually pays attention throughout this entire book, which always amazes me. And three, the DIALOGUE. It's pitch perfect. Every word choice is spot on. The conversation between Papa and Little Red Chicken reads like any parent with their child at bedtime. Little Red Chicken is impatient and impulsive, she can't wait to interrupt, because after all, she knows what's going to happen. I find that when I read this book aloud, I don't have to think about the inflections in my voice, or the best way to tell the story for my son to understand what's happening. It just naturally happens because the text is so good. Keep in mind this is a book that won a Caldecott Honor, and I'm telling you how wonderful the text is. I haven't even mentioned how amazing the illustrations are. Two styles in one book! That's how great this book is.

2. AND THEN IT'S SPRING Written by Julie Fogliano, Illustrated by Erin Stead

Following a snow-filled winter, a young boy and his dog decide that they've had enough of all that brown and resolve to plant a garden. They dig, they plant, they play, they wait...and wait...until at last, the brown becomes a more hopeful shade of brown, a sign that spring may finally be on its way.

Every time I read Julie's words, it hurts. They are just so good. Personally, I think she is one of the best writers in children's lit, not just picture books. Her WORD CHOICE is exquisite. Every line seems perfectly constructed. Each word meticulously chosen. I once read that J.D. Salinger agonized over every word choice. Each one had to be perfect or he'd cross it out. I imagine that is what it's like for Julie. Her words are captivating and ask you to run away with them in such an effortless way, which of course I'm sure she would say otherwise. Here is my favorite passage:

and the brown, 
still brown, has a greenish hum
that you can only hear
if you put your ear to the ground
and close your eyes

Just beautiful. Oh, and did I mention the art is created by Caldecott winning illustrator Erin Stead. Any illustrator looking for a lesson in perfect composition and execution, look at this book. The illustrations are absolutely stunning and there are so many lovely details to look for on each page.

3. THE DAY THE CRAYONS QUIT Written by Drew Daywalt, Illustrated by Oliver Jeffers

Poor Duncan just wants to color. But when he opens his box of crayons, he finds only letters, all saying the same thing: His crayons have had enough! They quit! Beige Crayon is tired of playing second fiddle to Brown Crayon. Black wants to be used for more than just outlining. Blue needs a break from coloring all those bodies of water. And Orange and Yellow are no longer speaking—each believes he is the true color of the sun. What can Duncan possibly do to appease all of the crayons and get them back to doing what they do best?

Okay, let's be totally honest here. This is one of those books that the first time I read it I was like "Dammit! I wish I'd thought of that!" I remember I was standing in Anthropologie of all places, that's how big the book had gotten already (I know, I know, how had I not seen this sooner...what can I say it was the summer I got married, things were crazy). The entire CONCEPT is absolutely brilliant, as you all probably already know. And not just that, but the voices of each crayon are so funny. I think Peach crayon is my favorite. The humor in this book is just off the charts. Every color, relationship, and concern is so well thought out. And this was a debut picture book paired with Oliver Jeffer's illustrations! It kills me, it's so good! A must have for any picture book collection.

4. THE NEW SMALL PERSON by Lauren Child

Elmore Green starts life as an only child, as many children do. He has a room to himself, where he can line up his precious things and nobody will move them one inch. But one day everything changes. When the new small person comes along, it seems that everybody might like it a bit more than they like Elmore Green. And when the small person knocks over Elmore’s things and even licks his jelly-bean collection, Elmore’s parents say that he can’t be angry because the small person is only small. Elmore wants the small person to go back to wherever it came from. Then, one night, everything changes. . . .

This is not only my favorite new sibling book, but it's also one of my favorite books of all time. I think the VOICE is what really sets it apart. Elmore Green does not want a new sibling, he won't even refer to him by name, just "The New Small Person." He has no interest in sharing his jelly beans, especially the orange ones, or tv shows, or his collection of things. Everything about Elmore is so spot on with what a kid would actually do and say. I love how the two brothers finally come together in the middle of the night after Elmore has a nightmare and the new small person proclaims "Go away scary!". This book is clever and sweet all at once, punctuated by Lauren Child's whimsical cut-paper illustrations.

5. IN A BLUE ROOM Written by Jim Averbeck, Illustrated by Tricia Tusa

Alice is wide, wide awake. Mama brings flowers, tea, a quilt, even lullaby bells to help her sleep. But none of these things are blue, and Alice can sleep only in a blue room. Yet when the light goes out, a bit of magic is stirred up. Pale blue moonlight swirls into her bedroom window. Then the night swirls out, around the moon and into the universe, leaving Alice fast alsleep in a most celestial blue room.

This is a one of my favorite bedtime books in our collection. I have loved this book since it came out and I was hand-selling it as a bookseller in The Children's Book Shop in Boston. Jim Averbeck does such as amazing job creating the mood of this story. Throughout the story he references the all the senses, colors, and creates a feeling of total relaxation. I can smell the lilacs, feel the warm tea, and hear the soft sound of lullaby bells chiming in the breeze. This book is like a warm comfy quilt wrapped around you before you drift off to sleep. And perfectly illustrated by the always amazing Tricia Tusa who paces the final lines of the book in one of the best succession of spreads I've ever seen in a picture book. Love love this book.

Please take a moment to check these books out from your local library if you get the chance. They are wonderful reads!

Happy Reading!

Lindsay

 

Welcome to Critter Lit!

Authors, Illustrators, Authors + IllustratorsLindsay WardComment

Welcome to Critter Lit!

A new site where you can receive FREE one-time critiques on picture book illustrations and manuscripts.

The idea of Critter Lit had always been there, but it wasn't until recently that I felt it was time to finally launch it. 2017 has started out rough for most Americans. Everywhere I look people are fearful and uncertain about the future. So now seems as good a time as any to look to the future, to embrace it, to help raise it up!

So how can I make a better world for the next generation? The answer seems impossible and although I'm just one person, there are at least two things I can offer: advice and experience. The best way I know how to do that is through books. So, what does that mean exactly?

Well, for starters it's time to give back. There are so many up-and-coming writers and illustrators who need a chance to tell their stories. But unfortunately publishing has become more and more competitive, to the point where it's nearly impossible to break-in. Critiques are expensive. Conferences even more so. And getting your work in front of an agent or editor seems unattainable.

So here's a crazy thought...FREE one-time critiques from someone in the business. Me.

I want to help you shape the books of tomorrow in hopes that they will make a difference for the next generation of readers. 

MANUSCRIPT CRITIQUES FREE one-time critiques delivered in 2 weeks.

ILLUSTRATION CRITIQUES FREE one-time critiques delivered in 3 days.

I wish all of my time were up for grabs, but unfortunately it's not. I have a family, responsibilities, and my own creative projects to develop, just like all of you.

So here's my promise: all first-time critiques are FREE. Additional manuscripts or passes, dummy critiques, and page breaks are available for an additional fee. There's no obligation. If my advice or suggestions helped you, great! Come back and maybe we can work on something else together. If not, hopefully you gained something out of the experience to take with you along your creative journey.

My hope is that your work gets published. There were many people who helped me on my road to publication, and for them I will forever be grateful. People who donated their time and advice without question. Because that's the best thing about the children's lit community, we support one another.

So here's my chance to support you.

Happy Writing!

Lindsay