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Interview with Author Gayle C. Krause

Authors, Interviews, Vet InterviewsLindsay WardComment

Happy Thursday Critters! This week we have an interview with Gayle C. Krause, whose newest book, DADDY, CAN YOU SEE THE MOON?, illustrated by Carlos de la Garza, focuses on the relationship between a boy and his father, who is deployed overseas. I was so touched by the story and message in this book, as I know all of you will be too! I’m thrilled to have Gayle with us today, sharing her work.

So without further ado, please welcome Gayle C. Krause!

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Where do you live? 

I live in a country cliffside house in Northeastern PA overlooking PA, NY, and NJ.  The Delaware River, which divides PA from NY, is two blocks from my house.

 When did you know you wanted to write picture books?

I always made up stories to entertain my sisters and the neighborhood kids when I was a child, but I didn’t start thinking about writing them down until I was the Director of a Laboratory PRE-K in a teacher education program, which was my first career.

 Tell us about your road to publication, what did that involve for you?

My first picture book, ROCK STAR SANTA (2008), was an original Scholastic Book Club acquisition, which is rare these days. I met my editor at the Rutgers One-on-One Conference. It was my first foray into writing for children and I’ve been writing ever since. 

My second book was a YA urban fantasy titled RATGIRL: Song of the Viper, which is a retelling of The Pied Pier set in a dystopian future with global warming. It’s one of my favorite things that I have written.

DADDY, CAN YOU SEE THE MOON? is my second picture book, eleven years after my first. You see, the key is to never give up your dream.

 Can you share a bit about your process?

I write in the morning as soon as I get up. My house is quiet because my husband is still sleeping and I’m free to let my mind wander in and out of scenes with my characters. If I can’t write for a solid time period, then I jot down ideas as they come to me. I’ve been known to write a whole chapter from a sentence or two quickly written on a scrap piece of paper or a napkin.

 What do you do to shake the rust off or get new ideas?

I am NOT a believer of the Butt-In-Chair writing philosophy. I would only waste my time. If the kernel of an idea has not already sprouted in my mind, I can’t force it to come by staring at a blank computer screen. 

So I do something else in the creative realm like quilting or doll-making until one of my characters speaks to me, or shouts at a villain, or gives a cheeky answer to another character…and then I’m off and writing.

 Anything you can’t live without while you write?

The Internet. Whether I’m writing a silly picture book, a serious YA, or a whimsical MG (I never write nonfiction) it requires research. Did you know that baby T-Rex’s looked like fuzzy baby chicks? Or That you could make a bonfire on ice without it melting? 

 Any authors and/or illustrators who inspire you?

Authors – Juliet Marillier for fantasy 

Illustrator – Kinuko Y. Craft also for fantasy

 Dream project to work on?

It’s funny you should say a dream project. All of my stories start as dreams. Even as I am writing one, I’m dreaming of another, something that’s saying… “hurry up and finish what you’re writing. You need to write my story.”

 Tell us about your new book.

Written in rhyme, Daddy, Can You See the Moon? is about the special moments a young boy and his deployed dad share by looking at the moon, until the father comes home a wounded warrior and the boy realizes that love was what kept them connected all along. Carlos de la Garza’s illustrations are vibrant and beautiful and realistically portray the poignant story my words tell.

 What’s up next for you?

Once Upon a Twisted Tale is a ‘Fractured Fairytale’ poetry collection I’ve worked on for several years. And it will be released on June 18, 2019, also from SPORK. As you can tell from the answers to my other questions, I love fantasy and fairytales. This collection combines unlikely characters in the same story. Here is a quote from the introductory poem – 

“These characters, right or wrong—

in stories where they don’t belong.”

The illustrations were done by Caroline O’Neal and have a beautiful, ethereal touch of “fairy” in each one.

 And last, but not least, favorite 80s movie?

 It would have to be Princess Bride.


Huge thank you to Gayle C. Krause for stopping by Critter Lit today! We can’t wait to see what you do next!


As a Master Educationalist, GAYLE C. KRAUSE has taught Children’s Literature, creative writing, and storytelling techniques at the secondary and post-secondary levels. She’s a member of SCBWI, the 12 x 12 Picture Book Challenge, and a past member of The Poets’ Garage. Gayle is the author of six children’s books. Her work has been nominated for the Boston Globe/Horn Book Award and the International Reading Award. She currently serves on Angie Karcher’s National Rhyme Revolution Committee, choosing the best rhyming picture book from 2015-2018 and presents writing seminars to children’s authors. Rebecca Angus of Golden Wheat Literary represents her.

FOR MORE INFORMATION about Gayle, visit her online at http://www.gayleckrause.com or follow her on social media:

Twitter @GeeCeeK

Instagram

Facebook

TO ORDER Gayle’s book, ring up your local bookstore or click here.

BOOK GIVEAWAY!

Want a chance to win a copy of DADDY, CAN YOU SEE THE MOON?! Comment on this post or share it on Twitter. One lucky winner will be selected Thursday, May 23rd! US addresses only please.

What's up on deck? Tune in next week for an interview with author/illustrator Scott Magoon!

Interview with Author Julie Falatko

Authors + Illustrators, Authors, Interviews, Vet InterviewsLindsay Ward6 Comments

Happy Thursday Critters! I’m so very excited about our guest today— the amazingly talented and oh so funny Julie Falatko! We are huge fans of Julie’s books in our house, Snappsy the Alligator…need I say more??? I’m thrilled to feature an interview with Julie today and share her latest book THE GREAT INDOORS, illustrated by Ruth Chan, which has already received a starred review and has been selected as a Junior Library Guild book!

So without further ado…please welcome Julie Falatko!

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Where do you live?

I live in Maine, outside of Portland. I don’t want to make anyone else jealous, but it’s the best place to live. In my opinion. For me. And maybe you? You probably love where you live. And – oh, wait. If I talk about how great Portland is, everyone will move here, and then it will be overcrowded and not so great anymore. So never mind. I live in Maine, outside of Portland, and it’s adequate.

How many years have you been in publishing?

My first book, Snappsy the Alligator (Did Not Ask to Be in this Book) came out in 2016.

How did you first get published?

I got published in what I think is The Standard Way: I queried agents who seemed like a good fit, got an offer from the slush pile, and then that agent submitted my manuscript to an editor, who acquired it. People sometimes want to hear of some secret talisman (“oh, I see, so my mistake was that I wasn’t wearing red, got it”) but the truth is The Standard Way is the way it usually happens.

Do you write full-time?

I…do. I certainly spend a full-time number of hours working on writing and writing-related tasks, like publicity. But if I was not married to someone with a full-time job that pays decently and comes with health benefits, I would not be writing full time. I write full-time hours, but haven’t gotten to a point of full-time pay yet.

What inspires you to create picture books?

Picture books are my favorite literary medium. There are so many directions they can go, and, at their best, they are perfect nuggets of someone’s view of the world. It’s inspiring to try to rise to the challenge of fitting so much story and nuance and entertainment into such a small package. But honestly most of my ideas involve talking squirrels and birds and alligators and dogs, and those ideas are probably best suited for a picture book. 

What surprised you the most working as an author?

How long it truly takes to make a picture book. I had known it wasn’t a quick process, but I hadn’t really absorbed that it was a two-and-a-half-year process at the very minimum, and often much longer. I’ve come to love the long lead time, both because it makes for a better book, but also because it allows me to have a lot of different projects going on at once. 

What is your favorite thing about being an author?

I’m supposed to say my favorite thing is hearing from kids, but the truth is that’s my second favorite thing. The fact that I get to write such silly stories with jokes that first and foremost are in there just to crack myself up – that’s my first favorite thing. I am so lucky this is my job.

What do you find difficult working as an author?

The answer to this has probably changed a bit over the years, but right now the answer is that I’m having trouble focusing. 2017 was a very scattered year, focus-wise, and since then it has been a constant struggle to force my brain to remember what it’s here to do, and to rein my thoughts in from what they apparently want to do, which is tap dance in the many fields and meadows that have nothing to do with my writing work.

What do you do to shake the rust off or get new ideas?

I get up. I move around. Mostly I go outside. I take my dogs for a walk every morning, and much of that walk is spent mulling over ideas and talking them out loud to see what sounds right.

Anything you are habitual about when it comes to creativity?

I like to make a list every day of what I’m planning on getting done, and then I’m pretty good about forcing myself to sit down and do it. I do often light a candle. I do often meditate in the morning. I always exercise first thing, because I feel like it gets my blood moving and sends some blood to my brain which makes my ideas better (I have no idea if this is a scientific principle or just my general notion that exercise helps me think, and I’m afraid to find out, in case it’s not true). But the biggest thing is that I feel so grateful that right now this is my job, and so I’m very determined and motivated to work as hard as I can at it. The books don’t get made unless I write the words, so, no matter what, it’s up to me to sit down and write them.

Can you share a positive experience you’ve had in the Kid Lit community?

The people of the children’s book world are just the nicest. The whole darn thing has been a positive experience. The entire community is all about boosting and supporting and shouting our celebrations, and it’s lovely. Whenever I do meet other children’s book makers or librarians or teachers in person, we all spend the entire time talking about how much we appreciate each other and each other’s work. In my experience, children’s book makers seem like incredibly nice people online, and then you meet them, and they’re even nicer than you thought they were.

Recommended reading?

I just read Damsel by Elana K. Arnold and it completely blew me away. I also just read When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon, which is a few years old, and I can’t believe it took me so long, because I adored it. Recent picture books I loved are Another by Christian Robinson and Bikes for Sale by Carter Higgins and illustrated by Zachariah OHora. Also I just finished the graphic novel Sheets by Brenna Thummler and I love how it mixes genres, and the illustrations in it are incredible.

What has been the highlight of your career thus far?

The book launch party for Snappsy the Alligator (Did Not Ask to Be in This Book), at Books of Wonder in New York City, was an incredible and overwhelming day. Snappsy illustrator Tim Miller and I signed books for hours. It was cool enough just to have a published book with my name printed on the cover, after so many years of homemade books where I wrote my own name in crayon. And then to pack the bookstore with friends and family to celebrate Tim and my debut together was unforgettable. I also had the richest hot chocolate I’ve ever had in my life on that day. But that’s probably not relevant. 

What is something you wish someone had told you when you first started writing?

Do the work. You can only get so far on industry connections or on wishing really hard. Yes, there is some luck involved. But none of the luck happens unless you do the work first. So always, always, prioritize the work.

Can you tell us about your newest book?

The Great Indoors is about a group of forest animals who go on vacation inside a human family’s house every year, during the same week that the human family goes camping. It is absolutely based on my own family’s yearly camping trips, and how the week starts off with us thrilling at the wonder of nature, and ends with us ready to trade large sums of money for a toilet that flushes.

What’s up next for you?

The third book in the Two Dogs in a Trench Coat series is out in May. They go on a class trip to a museum in this one. It’s pretty silly.

Anything else you’d like to share with aspiring authors and illustrators?

There are no tricks to succeeding in this business. If you’re querying, follow the rules on an agency’s website. Be kind. People remember kindness, and they also remember jerkiness. Above all, put in your time, and don’t rush it. Publishing is a slow business, so there’s no reason for you to move quickly. Take your time to make sure your work is as good as you can make it. And keep working.

And last, but not least, favorite 80s movie?

Well, this is impossible. I’m tempted to create a spreadsheet. I just. How? This is my favorite movie decade. Ok. Fine. It’s a tie between The Breakfast Club and Real Genius.


Huge thank you to Julie Falatko for stopping by Critter Lit today! We are so excited about your upcoming books and can’t wait to see what you do next!


JULIE FALATKO writes about misunderstood characters trying to find their place in the world. She is the author of several picture books, including the Snappsy the Alligator  books, and of the Two Dogs in a Trench Coat chapter book series. Julie lives in Maine with her husband, four children, and two dogs, where she maintains a Little Free Library in front of her house.

FOR MORE INFORMATION about Julie and her work, visit her online here or follow her on social media:

Twitter

Instagram

 Facebook

TO ORDER Julie’s books, ring up your local bookstore or click here.

BOOK GIVEAWAY!

Want a chance to win a copy of THE GREAT INDOORS?! Comment on this post or share it on Twitter. One lucky winner will be selected Thursday, May 2nd! US addresses only please.

What's up on deck? Tune in next week for an interview with author/illustrator Philip Stead and illustrator Erin Stead!

Interview with Author Natascha Biebow

Authors, Interviews, Vet InterviewsLindsay Ward8 Comments

Happy Thursday Critters! Today we have an interview with Natascha Biebow, author of THE CRAYON MAN: THE TRUE STORY OF THE INVENTION OF CRAYOLA CRAYONS, illustrated by Steven Salerno, which just released last month. How cool does this book sound?! I’m so excited about this biography and I can’t wait to share it and Natascha’s work with all of you!

So without further ado…please welcome Natascha Biebow!

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Where do you live?

I live in London, England.

How many years have you been in publishing?

I published my first book in 1995, and have worked as a children’s book editor since 1993.

How did you first get published?

I wrote my first book, Eleonora, a true story about how elephants mourn each other, as part of a children’s literature course at Smith College. It was kicking about for a couple of years before I decided to show it to the publisher of a small children’s picture book imprint, ABC. I was surprised and delighted when she said she’d like to publish it. The publishing industry was very different then – no social media (!) or easy way to get the word out – so, though it sold reasonably well, it is sadly now out of print.

Do you write full-time?

I wish! But I’m lucky that I have a day job that I love – I edit children’s books freelance for big and small publishers, and coach and mentor authors and illustrators to fine-tune their work pre-submission through my literacy consultancy Blue Elephant Storyshaping.

What inspires you to create picture books?

Picture books are my passion. I have an affinity with this young age group and love the synergy of words and pictures working together.

What surprised you the most working as an author?

The Crayon Man: The True Story of the Invention of Crayola Crayons is my first non-fiction picture book, so I was surprised by the amount of research and fact-checking that was involved, even in late stages of book production, and how much time this took. But I enjoyed doing it!

What is your favorite thing about being an author?

I love that you get a printed book at the end of your creative journey that you can share with young readers so that you can enthuse them with the story too. I love connecting with young readers (and grown-ups’ inner child).

What do you find difficult working as an author?

Possibly the most challenging aspect is that picture books evolve in the course of their editorial journey and sometimes you have to reconcile aspects of your original vision with the final version. This is part of the creative, collaborative approach, though, and leads to a better book ultimately.

What do you do to shake the rust off or get new ideas?

I look for ideas all around me – from people, pets, the news and experiences . . . I try to learn at least one new fact a day. A walk is often great for getting unstuck and figuring out stuff too. 

Anything you are habitual about when it comes to creativity?

I don’t keep extensive notes – most of my work is done in my head! I love stationery though – so doodling with colored crayons is a great way to brainstorm ideas and tap into my inner child.

Can you share a positive experience you’ve had in the Kid Lit community?

I have volunteered for over 20 years as the Regional Advisor for the SCBWI British Isles region. It has led to so many great opportunities to help learn new skills and make connections with people in the industry. I learned how to make a book trailer from fellow volunteers. I met my agent at the SCBWI conference in LA. I took a non-fiction writing course recommended by another writer that got me connected to the non-fiction Kid Lit community. And so much more! People are really very giving and supportive.

Recommended reading?

Yes, read read read every new picture book you can get your hands on. In terms of craft-based reading, I love Writing the Breakout Novel by Donald Maass– though it’s about novel-writing, all the elements and thinking logic are the same for picture books.

What is your favorite thing about being an author?

I love that you get a printed book at the end of your creative journey that you can share with young readers so that you can enthuse them with the story too. I love connecting with young readers (and grown-ups’ inner child).

What has been the highlight of your career thus far?

I was awarded a SCBWI Marketing Grant to fund a mini-book tour this May, and so I’m excited to be able to connect with young readers in person!

What is something you wish someone had told you when you first started writing?

That I’d have to teach myself all about marketing and then implement it!

Can you tell us about your newest book?

The Crayon Man: The True Story of the Invention of Crayola Crayons is a non-fiction picture book biography: the true story of Edwin Binney, a man who had a knack for listening and making what people needed, whose love for color led to the invention of one of America’s most iconic toys – Crayola crayons. In a world where we take crayons for granted, what must it have been like to only have slate and chalk? It’s a fabulous journey of color and creativity, an inspiring story for the next generation of inventors who will be our future.

What’s up next for you?

Hopefully more non-fiction picture books. I am also writing a series of chapter books, which is a new venture for me.

Anything else you’d like to share with aspiring authors and illustrators?

I’ve realized that if you’re serious about writing for children and getting your work published, you need to make a real effort to carve out the focus and time and just do it. There is no greater writing tip than butt on seat.

And last, but not least, favorite 80s movie?

E.T. heart-warming, flying bicycles, “E.T. phone home!” – all part of my childhood.


Huge thanks to Natascha for stopping by Critter Lit today! We love your new book and can’t wait to see all your upcoming projects!


NATASCHA BIEBOW’S favourite crayon color is periwinkle blue because it makes her heart sing. She loves to draw and make stuff, just like the inventor of the Crayola crayons. She lives in London, where she writes, edits, coaches and mentors children’s book authors and illustrators at Blue Elephant Storyshaping, and is the long-time Regional Advisor of SCBWI British Isles. In 2018, she was awarded an MBE for her services to children's writers and illustrators.

FOR MORE INFORMATION about Natascha and her work, visit her online here or follow her on social media:

Facebook

LinkedIn

TO ORDER Natascha’s books, ring up your local bookstore or click here.

BOOK GIVEAWAY!

Want a chance to win a copy of THE CRAYON MAN: THE TRUE STORY OF THE INVENTION OF CRAYOLA CRAYONS ?! Comment on this post or share it on Twitter. One lucky winner will be selected Thursday, 25th! US addresses only please.

What's up on deck? Tune in next week for an interview with author Julie Falatko!

Happy New Year Critters!

Authors, Authors + Illustrators, Craft, Debut Interviews, Illustrators, Interviews, publishing, Vet InterviewsLindsay Ward1 Comment

Happy New Year Critters! Can you believe it’s 2019?! I feel as though 2018 flew by! I’m excited to dive into this year and see what exciting adventures await. 2019 will be filled with three new book releases for me as well as a fabulous list of upcoming debut and veteran interviews! Check out some of the authors, illustrators, and author/illustrators who will be stopping by Critter Lit this year:

Lindsay Leslie

Meera Sriram

Sue Fliess

Cathy Breisacher

Shawnie Clark

Jamie L. B. Deenihan

Cathy Ballou Mealey

Julie Falatko

Sheri Dillard

Scott Magoon

Mikela Provost

Ishta Mercurio

Debbie Ridpath Ohi

Jenn Harney

Christopher Denise

June Smalls

Sue Reagan

Amanda Jackson

Tara Lazar

and more! I’m so excited to share with you what these amazingly talented people have to say about their process and work. This year is your year! Finish that novel, picture book, middle grade, young adult…you got this!

“It’s never too late to be what you might have been.” - George Eliot

So go out there and start writing!

Check in with me on Twitter for some Critter Lit Writing Resolutions that I’ll be posting throughout the month of January. Have a writing resolution of your own? I’d love to hear it!

Until next time…

xo

Lindsay